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20120926
20121004
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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
the civil rights movement, the gay and less lesbian movement. actually, i would like to say especially to my republican women friends these folks are not republicans. a lot of them used to be democrats. and started to lead the republican party when the civil rights act of 1963 passed and so on. so my -- really what's happened is that one party has campaigned against women you know. women have responded to that. >> jennifer: so you're stumping for the president. is president obama a feminist? >> yes i think he's a feminist. we had worked with him in illinois when he was in the state legislature. and he supported all of the issues of equality and he supported reproductive freedom. and the point is any way that feminist is a word that we chose because it could apply to men as well as women. and it -- it just means a person who is in favor of full social economic political equality of women and men and it is a great boon to men too. it actually has lengthened their lives, you know, to stop the extreme polarization of the gende
pennsylvania. a whole issue of voter suppression and having been in charlotte, a great civil-rights city, where the students from the historical black college in 1960 set up a lunch counter in to grant them and yet, what do we see today? state after state, efforts to suppress voting rights instead of expanding them. not enough people vote in this country. in pennsylvania, there is legislation now on the books that could disenfranchise between 750,000-1 million people. president obama won by 600,000 boats in pennsylvania last time. this really does determine the election. i don't care who you are for. this will determine the election. it is a huge problem or the country. we should be celebrating voters going to the polls, not putting impediments in their way. host: the radio program "democracy now" turns 25 this year? guest: we started in 1996. we were just on radio. the week of september 11, 2001, we started on the first television station in new york city on public access. then it just caught on like wildfire beyond the election and more television stations aired us and radio stations and npr
this year's elections. the civil rights group believes up to 6 million americans are being blocked from voting because of felony criminal records. >>> in spain, dozens of protesters have been injured in clashes witholice. they're angry over cuts in public employee salaries, health and education as spain races to deal with massive debt. >>> in russia, this is incredible video. it shows a truck driver literally walking away from a crwith another big rig he was hurled from his cab at the moment of impact but amazingly landed right up with barely a scratch. >>> and finally, this is the deepest view of space you have ever seen. the hubble telescopeas sent back picture me an 13 billliyearin t ng it's a collage of views, more than 5,000 galaxies captured over ten years. >>> now a first look at this lics.ng's dish of scrambled next month, stevie wonder is among the stars performing at benefit concert for president obama in los angeles. the hollywood reporter also says that on the bill with wonder will be jennifer hudson and kat perry. >>> michael bloomberg is on the nuerneheer in political offi
was blocked in unprecedented ways. >> caller: civil rights. let me make another civil rights point. >> stephanie: okay. >> caller: he is obviously the worst civil rights president we have and this is why -- >> stephanie: oh quite obviously. what? >> caller: because he executed a citizen of the united states without an advocate for the defense. without any judicial involvement, without any judge jury -- >> stephanie: who are you talking about? >> ground strike on the guy who -- >> yes he did. >> caller: let me add one other thing. >> sure. >> caller: we think we know about larky came from the administration so we have no independent information. >> that's not true. the guardian and other places confirmed that's exactly what he did. it was a question of whether or not this was reason enough to do it. now, would you agree that we have had since we've had a standing army, the right to shoot soldiers who go awol in the process? we've had that. >> i would agree with you. >> i'm just saying legally. a command
win and my retort is if you look back over the years, from women's suffrage, civil rights, to more recently the alternative ener movement, have been borne from third parties garn hing enough votes away from the two major political parties so engrained in the status quo that they never impose the sweeping changes so i hope you can comment on the role of third parties not necessarily in winning elections but in changing the agenda to the point where we get the changes we end up treasuring over the next century. host: thank you for the call. dr. jill stein. guest: thank you for making that point, which is very important. in fact, what so many people call progress in this country, whether you talk about women getting the right to vote, the abbitionist slavery, the protection of workers in the workplace, the right to organize, the 40 hour work week, child labor laws, social social security, the new deal, you name it, all of these have come out of independent third parties, because as you say, the party that is are bought and paid for by large corporations which are part of the status qu
guaranteed act, on par with the civil-rights of the 1960's. host: john from illinois. caller: the only problem that i have is about the tax issue. the reason why i say that is our taxes in this country have never been set up to be fair. what they were set up for was that the rich were supposed to pay the majority of their taxes in federal taxes. working-class and the port were supposed to pay the majority of theirs in homeowners' taxes, city and state taxes -- ordering class and the poor. everything is out of sorts. when you are on fixed income and these states will have to have such a high tax rate because the federal government will have such a lower one. anybody i fixed tax rate goes in and buys a refrigerator that costs $400, will have about a $100 tax on the refrigerator. that is the problem. the ones it will hurt our people that are retired, people that are on disability, things like that. otherwise, i am completely in line with you. i voted for ron paul in 1988. i voted for paul brown. i think he -- i can remember what year it was that he ran as a libertarian. once.ed for ross p
and having been in charlotte, a great civil-rights city, where the students from the historical black college in 1960 set up a lunch counter in to grant them and yet, what do we see today? state after state, efforts to suppress voting rights instead of expanding them. not enough people vote in this country. in pennsylvania, there is legislation now on the books that could disenfranchise between 750,000-1 million people. president obama won by 600,000 boats in pennsylvania last time. this really does determine the election. i don't care who you are for. this will determine the election. it is a huge problem or the country. we should be celebrating voters going to the polls, not putting impediments in their way. host: the radio program " democracy now" turns 25 this year? guest: we started in 1996. we were just on radio. the week of september 11, 2001, we started on the first television station in new york city on public access. then it just caught on like wildfire. beyond the election and more television stations aired us and radio stations and npr stations and pbs stations all over the countr
to end the civil rights investigation. the board says african-american students receive an unfair majority of suspensions. the board has a plan in place to make sure students are treated equally. >>> a mother ran away leaving her daughter behind at the safeway to deal with police. the girl is staying with her grandmother. >>> nobel peace laureate ang sang su kyi will visit the area. she will speak at a sold out event tomorrow. we will have a look at the forecast and the morning commute when we come back. >>> welcome back. taking a live look at san francisco. i want to step out of the way so you see how foggy it is. that is the natural coolant off the pacific. we will soar into the weekend. a dangerous heat wave. if you work outdoors and you are caught off guard, you want to stay hydrated. it is not too bad right now. 61 in livermore. sunny finish for today. warmer than acknowledge conditions. heat wave sunday through tuesday. toward the end of next week, cooler weather arrives. we have to get through this, saturday through tuesday, triple digit heat. stay cool out there. let's che
support. >> all right. thanks for filling us in. as you know, there's a terrible civil war going on right now in syria. many people, many leaders, including our own, calling for the ouster of president assad who allegedly has been killing his own people in an effort to keep his seat. we'll have much more on the protests outside the united nations in the hours to come on cnn. of course, we'll be covering mahmoud ahmadinejad's speech which will come your way in a half hour. >>> let's talk football, huh. banning the replacement refs, the new jersey senate is pushing a bill to do that. you'll hear from him next. >> announcer: with nothing but his computer, an identity thief is able to use your information to open a bank account in order to make your money his money. [whoosh, clang] you need lifelock, the only identity theft protection company that now monitors bank accounts for takeover fraud. lifelock: relentlessly protecting your identity. call 1-800-lifelock or go to lifelock.com today. [ female announcer ] imagine skin so healthy, it never gets dry again. can your moisturizer do that? [ f
was the attorney for the american civil liberties union. the judge would say, all right. we're going to have an argument on that point of law. parents to you want to come back into my office. leyritz was sick, no, let arthur and of that. i don't do that. earlier in his career, i don't know how many of you had to read but the author was an attorney. he became the legal partner. most of the legal brief writing, when they had to go into the appeals court was done by masters. there is a whole chapter about their very famous falling got and the incredible spite they had for each other for the rest of their lives. they were both very greedy, womanizers, and both convinced that they were literary men thrown into the wrong profession and what they really needed was peace and quiet that the other one make all the money so i can retreat to my office or write poetry and novels. it is a great untold story of american legal history. >> did daryl ever get involved in politics and endorsed any candidates, though i expect a candid it might not want his endorsement. >> one of the exciting things i found when
it was strengthening our economy that we defend the civil liberties and rights of every new hampshire citizens because we want to attract people of talent and energy to our states. that means defending our marriage equality law and making sure that women can chart their own destiny by making their own health care decisions .. i love the public debate between you and ovide lamontagne. has been on social issues. any that you disagree and, how much impact they have on the economy and the impact -- business of new hampshire? hassan: i was on a plan last spring and i sat next to a young man who recruits for a major new hampshire business. he was telling me how important the marriage equality law that we passed was to his recruiting efforts because young people were more interested in coming to new hampshire to work here because we were committed to treating all of our granite staters the police. similarly for women the ability to make their own decisions about when to have families, about what kind of balance they want to seek in the workplace, finishing school, all of those things relate to their ability
. they are directing traffic in the area. civil war is continue to escalate in syrria. >> let's go to spain 38 people have been arrested and 64 injured as officers- ga th-unemployment in spain is close to 25 percent right now 8000 riot police gathered this morning. also following the latest out of greece we're getting word of a general strike for the entire nation of greece pretty much shut down today as workers there are on strike across the tire nation in that country. >> 5: 04 is the time right now and a another developing story we are following. please find hidden cameras in the san francisco home of montague elementary schoolarrested on drug charges. take a look at the video of eric king louis in court yesterday. he was a principal at that santa clara the elementary school. police found at least 10 hidden cameras and a teddy bear coat hanger a cigarette lighter and a watch. investigators say there's no apparent reason to have so many cameras especially one hidden in a teddy bear. there will look at what is found on computer files and see how the video cameras are related. >> what could make this
to protect people, without invading civil liberties. we are always working on the right balance there as well. it is a big job. >> will you stay in the administration if the president is reelected? >> i do not answer questions like that. >> if you were not homeland security, law and job would you want? attorney general? a commissioner of baseball? what is your dream? >> i think i want to focus on this job. this job, every day is an inventor. a lot of elements to it. >> madam secretary, thank you very much. >> thank you. >> at that same effect, a panel focused on the impact of cyber attacks on the private-sector, and how companies are dealing with it. this is about 50 minutes. joining us. -- >> thank you, everybody, for joining us. we will get started with the remainder of our program. now that we adequately frightened you this morning of all of the risks that are available to the hackers, we're now going to talk about cyber innovation. this is getting increased level of support and focused with efforts like cyber security awareness month and various wards going on. today we're going to have t
. i analyzed the situation to determine where it needed to be done and did the right thing. i think that that can happen. i think that by working together, that by being civil, you know, you have not seen any attack ads run by me. there have been attack ads run in this campaign, but not endorsed by me. i think that by partisanship is called for and can be accomplished, and i will work to do that. [applause] >> mr. plummer? >> absolutely. what i said i and my opening statements was true. the voters are hurting. they do not care if they are -- if you are republican or democrat. our farmers are struggling through one of the worst seasons they have ever seen. i announced this week that i would call for a discharge petition against leadership because they need a farm bill. there are some very serious policy issues out there now. is this right for southern illinois? there are a lot of issues that are not. obama care is bad. cap and trade is bad. the dream act is bad. i will not stand up for those issues, pushed by republican or democrat. the fact that the farm bill is not happening right
and he's right. there is a choice. it is a debate about the role of government and creating a civil society, a society where we look out for one another but maybe give people the tools to become independent. or we can choose mitt romney. you remember what mitt romney told eye owe wants back in june about president obama. >> he wants to hire more government workers. we need more firemen, more policemen, more teachers. did he not get the message in wisconsin, the american people did. it is time for us to cut back on government and help the american people. >> jennifer: so do the american people want us to cut the jobs of firemen policemen and teachers? well, sharp scrutiny on the role and the influence of public sector employees and their unions is the focus of the controversial new book, "new york times" best selling book from author and citadel political professor mallory factor. it is called bosses". rob taxpayers blind. mallory factor is joining us from new york. welcome back inside "the war room." >> thank yo
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)